WASHINGTON, DC – The LGBTQ Victory Fund has released a demographic and informational breakdown of the 432 openly LGBTQ candidates on the Nov. 6th ballot – looking at sexual orientation, gender identity, race/ethnicity, office level, party affiliation, and the equality levels of the states they ran in.

 

Also Read: Missouri's LGBT Caucus in General Assembly Will Grow to Three in January

Also Read: Illinois' LGBT Caucus in General Assembly Will Grow to Four in January

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Of those, 244 won, including 162 victorious Victory Fund endorsed candidates. Previously, Victory Fund released data on its endorsed candidates, but the data released today looks at all known openly LGBTQ candidates who were on the ballot on November 6.

 

The breakdown of data is below. A visual representation of the data is available at victoryfund.org/rainbowwave.

 

Among the key takeaways from the new data:

 

- 56.5 percent of known openly LGBTQ candidates won their races on Election Day, and 72.0 percent of Victory Fund endorsed candidates were successful;

- 136 of the 244 victorious candidates are non-incumbents and 79.3 percent of incumbent candidates won their races;

- LGBTQ men ran in higher numbers than LGBTQ women, yet women candidates won at a higher rate (63.4 percent to 56.7 percent);

- 25.0 percent of LGBTQ candidates who ran were people of color and 56.5 percent won their races; and

 - 86.1 percent of LGBTQ candidates ran as Democrats and 61.0 percent won, whereas 5.3 percent of LGBTQ candidates ran as Republicans and just 17.4 percent won.

 

“Never in our nation’s history have so many openly LGBTQ people decided to run for office and be the change they demand to see in the world – and we are determined to ensure this energy does not fade,” said Mayor Annise Parker, President & CEO of LGBTQ Victory Fund. “We were able to ensure many of these leaders crossed the finish line on Election Day, and importantly, LGBTQ incumbents were overwhelmingly reelected by voters in states both red and blue.”

 

“While the Rainbow Wave of LGBTQ candidates who ran this year was the most diverse ever, there is still a long way to go before equitable representation for our entire community is achieved. It is vital we recruit and train more LGBTQ people of color, women and trans candidates because America needs their voices in the halls of power. LGBTQ political power is growing and we are ready to flex our muscles in local government, state Houses and the U.S. Congress, but as believers in the power of representation, we know LGBTQ candidates and elected officials must reflect our beautifully diverse community.”

 

Below is a breakdown of data for the 432 openly LGBTQ candidates who were on the ballot on November 6, 2018.*

 

2018 General  Election Candidates

Total on

Nov. Ballots

% of Total

Wins

Losses

Not Decided

% Won

Victory Fund Endorsed LGBTQ Candidates

225

52.1%

162

60

3

72.0%

Non-Endorsed LGBTQ Candidates

207

47.7%

82

123

2

39.8%

All LGBTQ Candidates

432

--

244

183

5

56.5%

Incumbency

Total on

Nov. Ballots

% of Total

Wins

Losses

Not Decided

% Won

Incumbents

135

31.3%

107

27

1

79.3%

Non-Incumbent

297

68.8%

136

157

4

45.8%

All LGBTQ Candidates

432

--

244

183

5

56.5%

 

Office Level

Total Who Ran

% of Total

Wins

Losses

Not Decided

% Won

Federal

28

6.5%

10

19

 

35.7%

Governor

4

0.9%

2

2

 

50.0%

Statewide

11

2.5%

6

5

 

54.5%

State Legislature

197

45.6%

110

84

3

55.8%

Judicial

34

7.9%

26

8

 

76.5%

Mayor

16

3.7%

10

6

 

62.5%

Local (not incl. mayor)

142

32.9%

80

60

2

56.3%

All LGBTQ Candidates

432

--

244

183

5

56.5%

 

Gender Identity

Total Who Ran

% of Total

Wins

Losses

Not Decided

% Won

Men

215

49.8%

122

91

2

56.7%

Women

172

39.8%

109

60

3

63.4%

Trans Men

8

1.9%

3

5

 

37.5%

Trans Women

19

4.4%

6

13

 

31.6%

Gender Non-Conforming

2

0.5%

1

1

 

50.0%

Intersex

1

0.2%

1

0

 

100.0%

Genderqueer/Non-binary

3

0.7%

0

3

 

0.0%

Other

3

0.7%

1

2

 

33.3%

Unknown

9

2.1%

1

8

 

11.1%

All LGBTQ Candidates

432

--

244

183

5

56.5%

 

Sexual Orientation

Total Who Ran

% of Total

Wins

Losses

Not Decided

% Won

Gay

207

47.9%

114

91

2

55.1%

Lesbian

139

32.2%

88

48

2

63.3%

Bisexual

28

6.5%

14

14

 

50.0%

Pansexual

7

1.6%

6

1

 

85.7%

Queer

18

4.2%

9

8

1

50.0%

Other

3

0.7%

1

2

 

33.3%

Unknown

30

6.9%

12

18

 

40.0%

All LGBTQ Candidates

432

--

244

183

5

56.5%

 

Race/Ethnicity

Total Who Ran

% of Total

Wins

Losses

Not Decided

% Won

White/Caucasian

288

66.6%

172

115

1

59.7%

Latinx/Hispanic;

48

11.1%

23

22

3

47.9%

African American/Black/ Afro-Caribbean

25

5.8%

17

8

 

68.0%

Asian/Asian Pacific Islander

17

3.9%

12

5

 

70.6%

Native American/

Alaska Native

3

0.7%

2

1

 

66.7%

Arab American/     Middle Eastern

2

0.5%

1

1

 

50.0%

Multiracial

13

3.0%

6

7

 

46.2%

Unknown

36

8.3%

11

24

1

30.6%

All LGBTQ Candidates

432

--

244

183

5

56.5%

 

Party Affiliation

Total Who Ran

% of Total

Wins

Losses

Not Decided

% Won

Democrat

372

86.1%

227

140

5

61.0%

Republican

23

5.3%

4

19

 

17.4%

Independent

8

1.9%

3

5

 

37.5%

Libertarian

8

1.9%

0

8

 

0.0%

Green

5

1.2%

1

4

 

20.0%

Non-Partisan

6

1.4%

3

3

 

50.0%

Other

4

0.9%

2

2

 

50.0%

Unknown

6

1.4%

4

2

 

66.7%

All LGBTQ Candidates

432

--

244

183

5

56.5%

 

State Equality Level**

Total Who Ran

% of Total

Wins

Losses

Not Decided

% Won

High-Equality State

211

48.8%

130

77

4

61.6%

Medium-Equality State

25

5.8%

11

14

 

44.0%

Low-Equality State

172

39.8%

89

81

1

51.7%

Negative-Equality State

21

4.9%

12

9

 

57.1%

Unknown (Guam)

3

0.7%

2

1

 

66.7%

All LGBTQ Candidates

432

--

244

183

5

56.5%

 

*Wins and losses numbers may not add up to the total who ran in certain categories because some races remain undecided.

** As defined by the Movement Advancement Project. 

 _______

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